Tag Archives: exercise

Alternative Low-Impact Exercise Options

Maybe you are bored with the same old exercise routine and want to try something different. Perhaps you are limited in your exercise choices for health reasons. Whatever the cause, here are some ideas for alternative exercise that might be perfect for a change of pace.

Yoga

Originating in ancient India, yoga has become a popular form of exercise in the modern world. Yoga is widely appealing because just about anyone can do it. This low-impact exercise is suitable for all ages and fitness levels. You may have images of people contorted into strange positions when you think of yoga. The basics in yoga are that you move your body into very specific postures, while focusing on breathing and energy. There is a strong focus on meditation, and many people around the world use yoga as a form of meditation.

The positions, or asanas, vary in complexity and can help develop flexibility, balance, strength, endurance, improve posture, increase core muscle strength, and release tension. Many proponents also claim it can ease pain, improve sleep, enhance mood, prevent cartilage and joint breakdown, lower blood pressure and blood sugar, increase immunity, and help regulate adrenal gland function.

There are many different styles of yoga for every lifestyle. Some classes may be done in a darkened candle-lit room as is sometimes done in Vinyasa yoga. Some rooms where yoga is practiced may be brightly lit with music pumping in the background, as in Power yoga. Other yoga classes may be conducted in a heated room with raised humidity, such as hot yoga and Bikram yoga. Contact your local fitness center to inquire about which types of yoga classes are offered, and they can help you determine which style would best suit your lifestyle and goals. Whatever style you choose to practice, wear non-restrictive clothing to sessions, and bring a towel and some water.

Pilates

Pilates was developed by Joseph Pilates in the 1920s to help injured athletes return to physical activity safely. At first glance, Pilates may seem similar to yoga because it is also low-impact, and there is a strong focus on different body positions. There is no spiritual aspect to Pilates, and the attention is solely on strengthening muscles, improving flexibility and postural alignment. Most Pilates movements target the core, although a full Pilates workout will work all areas of the body.

The benefits you may see from doing Pilates are improved posture and balance, flexibility and muscle strength, stronger core muscles, relaxation, and lower anxiety, among other things.

Typical Pilates workouts are 45-90 minutes long and may be done on thick mats (thicker than traditional yoga mats) or on machines called “reformers.” Reformers have a large frame with sliding platforms and a stationary footboard. There are straps or cords with springs and pulleys to provide resistance.

When you go to your first class, you may hear some terms that are unfamiliar such as “powerhouse,” which refers to the center of the body where all the power originates to perform movements. Another term, “peel through your spine,” describes slow movement within the spine from vertebra to vertebra. As with yoga, it is a good idea to wear non-restrictive clothing that will facilitate stretching and bring a towel and water.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese form of martial arts that has evolved into a non-competitive, slow series of focused and graceful movements that flow from one to the next. This type of exercise involves a lot of stretching while focusing on breathing deeply. As with yoga, there is a meditative aspect to Tai Chi. It is different from yoga in that your body is in constant but gentle motion. There are different styles of Tai Chi; some are more focused on health improvement and maintenance, while others focus more on the martial arts aspect of Tai Chi.

Because it is low-impact, Tai Chi puts minimal stress on muscles and joints—making it a safe form of exercise for any age or fitness level. Many people who are unable to exercise in traditional ways due to injury or physical limitations find that Tai Chi is an excellent alternative that allows them to stay fit and improve balance, flexibility, energy, agility, and stamina. Tai Chi is also practiced as a way to improve muscle strength and definition, to improve mood and decrease stress, anxiety, and depression.

Five Reasons You Need a Workout Buddy.

If you have started a new exercise regimen and are trying to make healthy changes in your lifestyle, kudos to you! Did you know that in addition to a set of earbuds, fit-bit or pedometer, favorite playlist, perhaps new shoes and workout clothes, you are missing something important? That would be your workout buddy. Even if you are a loner who prefers to exercise by yourself, you should really give serious consideration to finding another person to share your workout.

Here are some reasons why:

  1. The obvious reason most people find a workout buddy is motivation. On those days when you aren’t quite feeling it, and you don’t want to go to the gym or face whatever fitness challenges await you,  a workout buddy can hold you accountable and keep you from slacking off. It’s important that you choose someone who will push you and not let your laziness convince him/her to also skip the workout. Make sure your workout buddy has a schedule that is compatible with your own, or it’s doomed from the start.
  2. Your workout will be safer with a partner. If you are working out in the gym, your buddy can help you avoid injury. He/she can spot you when bench-pressing, and keep an eye on your form. Even the most experienced can lose focus and fall into improper form when attention is on completing repetitions. Having someone with you is an important way to avoid that and prevent potential injuries. Even if you are exercising outside the gym, doing it with a workout buddy is always safer in case you run into trouble.
  3. The competition will keep you running at full force, giving it your all. Many of us have a competitive streak, and working out with a partner helps to keep you at the top of your game because we don’t want to be the “weakest” link. There is actually a term for this; it’s called the Köhler Effect, and there have been studies  about it. They proved that when people work out with a partner who is in better shape than they are, they tend to perform better. So, choosing a buddy who is fitter than you will also motivate you to work out harder and longer than you might on your own.
  4. Most of us are creatures of habit. We tend to fall into the same routine, and after a while, it can get boring. Your workout buddy can introduce you to new exercises and new paths if you are into running, cycling,  walking, and other things that keep your workout fresh and interesting. Sharing what you know with each other can introduce variety into your exercise and make it more fun.
  5. Last, but not least, working out with a buddy is like a free therapy session. More than likely, you will eventually begin to share stories about things that happen at work or home,  and it’s a chance to get things off your chest and hear another person’s perspective on the situations you are dealing with. Even if you don’t feel comfortable sharing personal information, just having someone to chat with and share a few laughs while you exercise keeps you socially engaged, boosts your immune system, and decreases stress hormones.

So, start thinking about who would make a good workout buddy, and go ask him or her to meet up for your next workout!

Gardeners Rejoice!

How Gardening is Good For You

This is the time of year when yards come alive and we gardeners once again plan our gardens and begin selecting the beautiful flowers and vegetables that will fill our outdoor spaces. But the rewards we reap are not only colorful yards and tasty food that we have grown ourselves. Gardening is also wonderful for your health. It’s a great way to get that vitamin D which our bodies create when we spend time in the sun. By gardening, you can boost your endurance and strength, as well as flexibility.

benefits of gardening

Another terrific aspect of gardening is that you can burn a lot of calories as you are preparing the soil, tilling and hoeing, digging and planting, and weeding and pruning. These activities are a great way to work some good cardiovascular exercise into your daily routine.

Jeff Restuccio who wrote Fitness the Dynamic Gardening Way says it’s a good idea to alternate the more physically challenging gardening activities with the lighter work for a more structured exercise workout. He suggests, for example, raking for a while, then digging holes, then pruning.

As you do your “gardening exercise,” concentrate on deep breathing, and for a real boost in calorie burning, exaggerate your movements to increase the range of motion. For example, while raking or digging, stretch further than you usually would. This can increase your calorie burning from 100-200 per hour up to 500 per hour according to Restuccio. The actual number of calories burned varies with age, weight, and how much muscle you have. The heavier you are, the more calories you will burn. The younger you are, the more calories you’ll burn. Also, muscle burns more calories than fat, so if you have a more muscular build, you will also burn more calories.

In addition, try switching back and forth between hands when raking. Rake with your right hand 15 times, then do 15 times with your left hand. This will ensure both sides of your body are getting an equal work out.

For people who don’t consider gardening a real workout, Restuccio says, “If you think double digging (going down a foot, turning the soil over, then down another foot, bringing that soil to the top) isn’t exercise, you haven’t tried it.”

One of the best things about working in the garden, aside from the actual harvest, is that you can do it with the whole family. Get the kids and the grandparents out in the garden and let everyone participate. Make it a bonding activity that all can share, and in the process, everyone can get healthier too!

Some gardening safety tips:

  • Remember to stretch before you begin; gardening is exercise, and you can just as easily injure a muscle gardening as you can working out in the gym.
  • Be sure to stay well hydrated and use sunscreen.
  • To avoid hurting your back or knees, use a cushion when working close to the ground.
  • Instead of sitting on your heels, try to keep your back straight and be sure to stand and stretch every 10 minutes or so.
  • When choosing your shovel or spade, look for one that is lightweight and has a long handle.
  • Don’t overload your shovel when digging, and remember to bend at the knee, stepping forward when you raise and dump each shovel full of dirt.
  • While bending to pick up tools or heavy bags, bend at the knees and hips to avoid back strain.

What to Know if You Want to Start Cycling

Have you been thinking of investing in a new bike and getting your exercise on two wheels? It’s a great workout that is less jarring on joints than running or aerobics and may provide an excellent alternative. This sport has become so popular that nearly every city has plentiful routes for biking that will give you the chance to enjoy a scenic ride while you burn calories and build coordination and muscle strength.

how to get started cycling

Before you buy that new bike, here are some good things to know:

BUY LOCAL
You can save a lot of money buying through your local bike shop. Its employees will fit your bike to you to ensure it is a good match for you considering frame size and seat height. More than likely, they will also throw in a free service period for you, answer your questions, and provide information about local bike routes and cycling clubs in your area.

COMFORT NOT COST
Test ride the bike before you buy, and go for the best fit, not the best deal. Though it might seem counterintuitive, you don’t want a cushy soft saddle. Your weight will eventually settle down through it, leaving your rump resting on the hard piece below. It’s wiser to select a saddle that is firm and narrow which offers better support. You can wear padded spandex leggings that offer comfort. Although you may be a little sore that first week or two, you will acclimate to the seat and the discomfort will subside.

CONSIDER PURPOSE
Buy a bike with the gearing you will need for the type of riding you plan to do. While the off-road mountain trails can be very appealing, most new cyclists opt for street cycling, as it is the most accessible form of cycling and the most common. The bikes are lighter weight with skinny tires.

ESSENTIAL GEAR
Helmet: You should always wear a helmet when riding no matter what. Helmets have a shelf-life, so rather than dragging that old one out of the closet, it’s safer to buy a new one. There are safety standards set by the government, and the newer helmets will meet those standards. Try them all on to see which style you prefer, and which fits your head best.

Kit: The term for the typical “outfit” cyclists wear is called a “kit.”It consists of a jersey, matching padded bike shorts or bib shorts, and socks. These clothes are aerodynamic and help regulate body temperature. In addition, they will wick away sweat to avoid chafing. They come in an endless assortment of colors and styles.

Shoes: Athletic shoes are fine for a beginning cyclist, but with time, you may opt to switch to cycling shoes with clipless pedals. It takes some getting used to, so it is best to practice when you make this transition; as your pedals have a small catch to receive the cleat of your shoe, holding it in place so your feet can’t slide around or off the pedals. These specialized, stiff-soled shoes increase the efficiency of your pedaling by maximizing the transfer of energy from your legs to the pedal, especially during the upstroke. Your hamstrings assist with the stroke as your foot remains attached to the pedal when pulling up.

Gloves: If you haven’t ridden a bike in a while, you may not remember how blistered your hands can get from the pressure of holding on to the handlebar. Gloves are great for protecting your hands not only from blisters but also if you should have a fall.

Glasses: While protecting your eyes not only from the sun but also from bugs, dust, and debris, glasses will also make the ride much more enjoyable.

Take-alongs: Some important items that savvy cyclists bring with them are spare tubes, a mini pump, tire levers, and a multi-tool. Getting a flat out in the middle of nowhere is no fun,  and knowing how to switch out a tube is essential. There are plenty of how-to videos available online, and you can also ask your local cycle shop to show you how.

If you will be riding in an area with the likelihood of encountering pedestrians, get a bell for your bike, so you can alert people to your approach and prevent accidents. It’s always a good idea to bring one or two bottles of water along to stay hydrated. You might want to invest in a saddlebag to hold all these items.

Once you have your bike and all your gear, and you’re all suited up and ready to go, here are some important things to remember:

  • Start soft. You have nothing to prove. This should be enjoyable, and if you overdo it your first time out, you might lose the drive to keep it going. Start with a low mileage goal of 5-8 miles per ride, and each week add on just a little bit more.
  • Try to ride a few times per week instead of once a week. This will help you adjust to the new bike and gradually increase your fitness and stamina.
  • For the first month or so, try to plan routes that avoid steep hills or are too difficult. Keep it easy and fun.
  • Give yourself time to recuperate between rides. Just as your muscles need time to rest between workouts at the gym, the same is true with cycling. It is important to allow your body to rest and recuperate after a ride. Don’t go two days in a row.
  • Keep a cycling journal to chart your routes, highlights, and challenges and your feelings and experiences along the way. Tracking your progress is important.
  • Check out local cycling groups or see if a friend or co-worker would like to ride with you. It makes the experience even more enjoyable when you share it, and he/she can help you stay motivated on those days you just want to crawl back under the covers.  Lots of cities now host “no-drop” group rides, intended to help beginner cyclists learn group cycling etiquette and showcase local routes.

This sport is remarkably social and enjoyed by supportive enthusiasts who are eager to share their knowledge. Take your time getting to know as much as you can about cycling and the culture that has developed around it. On this journey, you are sure to get healthier and find many new friends along the way.

How to Exercise When the Pollen Count is High

If you are one of the many people who loves staying active outdoors, but you suffer from seasonal allergies, then you may find yourself becoming a lot more sedentary when spring arrives. Skipping out on these activities may help keep your allergies under control but becoming a “couch potato” is not the answer. Keep active by staying informed, changing your routine, and utilizing these strategies that will keep your body in motion and your energy at peak.

Track the Count
First you need to keep track of the pollen counts in your area. If you know which allergens you are sensitive to, that is even better. Many local news stations will tell you whether weed, tree, or grass pollens are expected to be higher than usual, and this can help you prepare. Another fast way to check pollen counts is online. Websites, such as the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology keep national pollen counts. You can check your local counts by clicking here.

Keep Your Eye on the Clock
Typically pollen counts will begin to rise in the morning and peak at midday, gradually falling toward evening. Generally, the lowest pollen count will be early in the morning before sunrise and late in the afternoon to early evening. However, if the pollen count is very high or if it is a windy day, pollen counts may remain elevated longer than usual. It is also normal in urban areas for the counts to peak and fall later than in the suburbs. Try to schedule your exercise to avoid the peak times of high pollen counts. The best time to get out is right after a good rainfall which washes a lot of the pollen out of the air and greatly reduces the pollen count.

Break out the Barriers
While outside, sunglasses can help protect your eyes not only from the sun, but also from pollen. Dab some Vaseline® around the edge of each of your nostrils before going out. This helps block pollen but be sure to reapply if you blow your nose. Covering your nose and mouth with a mask will really help minimize your inhalation of pollen when counts are high.

Choose an Alternative to Exercising Outdoors
If you usually exercise outside, consider trying a different venue for high pollen count days. There are many exciting and enjoyable opportunities such as indoor mountain climbing, indoor skiing, and even indoor sky diving.
A little less extreme option, but one that is easy and inexpensive is heading to a local indoor pool. Did you know that exercising in water is a great way to strengthen muscles? Water offers natural resistance that provides a more intense workout and increases the benefits of strengthening and toning. Even if you are not a swimmer, just walking, doing water aerobics, or dancing in the water offers great benefits. Many gyms and YMCAs offer the use of pools among their amenities for members, and city pools usually have a low entry fee for city residents.

In addition, Dr. Jay M. Portnoy, Division Director of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology at Children’s Mercy Hospitals in Kansas City says, “Allergies trigger asthma, making it much more difficult to exercise. It’s recommended that people with asthma take up swimming as an aerobic activity. The reason exercise makes asthma worse is because the airways dry out and get cold when you’re breathing fast. If you’re swimming instead of running outdoors, then there’s more moisture and warmth so you’re less likely to have trouble breathing.” Going to an indoor pool is a great way to avoid that pollen without skipping your exercise.

If walking or running is your thing, think “inside” the box. Many cities now have totally enclosed walking paths stretching for miles that can be an excellent way to get your exercise without subjecting yourself to pollen. If your city does not have an enclosed skywalk or underground pedestrian system, check with your local parks and recreation department as well as local fitness centers to see if there is an indoor walking track available. If not, consider walking through an indoor shopping mall or museum. Some cities have large airports that are fun to walk through as well.

Perhaps you prefer to avoid going outside altogether during pollen season. You can still get some great exercise right at home. If you own a treadmill or stationary bike, that would be an obvious first choice. However, for those of you who do not own any exercise equipment, why not try an exercise video? You can rent them at the library or find them available online. Amazon Prime and YouTube both have many fitness workout videos available for different fitness levels.

Whatever option you choose, it will definitely be better than skipping your exercise entirely. Track the pollen counts, strategize your timing, use barriers, and consider alternative venues for your exercise. You can avoid the pollen and still find different fun ways to stay fit!

 

Which Exercise Burns the Most Calories?

Getting the Most BURN for Your Buck!

Getting the Most BURN for Your Buck!

Whether you are doing squats, sprints, spinning, or swimming, you want to know that the exercise you choose is going to have a nice big return on investment when it comes to burning calories. You work hard and expect to see results, but which physical activity is going to help you reap the biggest rewards? After all, not all workouts are created equal.

If you don’t have a lot of time to exercise, the good news is that you can still maximize your energy expenditure with a short duration but high intensity workout. The activities which burn the greatest amount of calories are those which use more muscle mass and also involve resistance.

An excellent cardio workout for calorie burning is sprinting. Jim White, American College of Sports Medicine spokesperson, says, “Sprinting burns a massive amount of calories, but it can only be kept up for a certain amount of time.” He suggests alternating between two minutes running at the fastest pace you can sustain, and then jogging for a minute to recover before resuming the faster pace again. Running at a pace of 7.5 miles per hour, a 155-pound person can burn 465 calories in a thirty-minute span of time. That is excellent efficiency!

Tabata workouts are another incredibly efficient way to burn calories. Typical Tabata workouts will rotate between four different exercises, such as crunches, jumping rope, squat jumps, and lunges in 20-second increments followed with 10 seconds of rest. This is repeated in cycles for about half an hour. The American Council on Exercise found that in an average 20- to 30-minute Tabata workout, one can burn about 15 calories per minute, or 450 calories per half hour.

Since swimming requires using so many different muscle groups from the kicking of your legs, the stroking of your arms, and the tightening of core muscles as well, it is no wonder that this type of exercise ranks as one of the best calorie-burning cardio workouts. The type of swim stroke you choose will play a role in how many calories you burn. For example, a 155-pound person doing the butterfly stroke can burn 409 calories per half hour in comparison to 372 calories in the same time frame for the breast stroke. If you swim in the ocean, the current of the waves also gives an added challenge, upping the intensity of your workout and maximizing the calories burned.

These three types of workouts will help you burn calories fast. But, check out the exercises below to decide which type you prefer.

These activities will burn approximately the listed number of calories for a 155-pound person in a 30-minute period:

  1. Basketball ——————————————-298 cal
  2. Bicycling (12-13.9 mph) ————————– 298 cal
  3. Bicycling (20 mph) ———————————614 cal
  4. Circuit training ————————————–298 cal
  5. Cross country hiking ——————————223 cal
  6. Dancing slow (waltz, foxtrot, rumba)———-112 cal
  7. Dancing fast ( bally, twist)  ———————–223 cal
  8. Dancing (disco, ballroom, square) ————-205 cal
  9. Elliptical trainer ———————————— 335 cal
  10. Fencing ———————————————–223 cal
  11. High-impact aerobics —————————–260 cal
  12. High-impact step aerobics ———————–372 cal
  13. Horseback riding ———————————–149 cal
  14. Ice skating ——————————————–260 cal
  15. Jumping rope —————————————372 cal
  16.  Kayaking  ——————————————–186 cal
  17. Low-impact aerobics ——————————205 cal
  18. Low-impact step aerobics ————————260 cal
  19. Martial arts (judo, karate, kickbox) ————372 cal
  20. Moderate calisthenics —————————–167 cal
  21. Moderate stationary bicycling ——————260 cal
  22. Moderate stationary rowing ———————260 cal
  23. Running (5 mph) ————————————298 cal
  24. Running (7.5 mph) ———————————465 cal
  25. Running (10 mph) ———————————-614 cal
  26. Ski machine ——————————————353 cal
  27. Soccer ————————————————-260 cal
  28. Stair-step machine ———————————223 cal
  29. Stretching, Hatha yoga —————————-149 cal
  30. Swimming (backstroke) —————————298 cal
  31. Swimming (vigorously) or breaststroke ——-372 cal
  32. Swimming (butterfly or crawl) —————— 409 cal
  33. Tai Chi ————————————————–149 cal
  34. Tennis ————————————————–260 cal
  35. Vigorous stationary rowing ———————–316 cal
  36. Vigorous Tabata ————————————-450 cal
  37. Volleyball ———————————————149 cal
  38. Walking (4.5 mph) ———————————-186 cal
  39. Weight lifting (vigorous) ————————–223 cal

 

Which is Right For You – a Personal Trainer or Dietitian?

If you are serious about losing weight and getting in shape, you may be wondering whether you should hire a personal trainer or a dietitian to help you achieve your goals. With the many different diets that have risen in popularity and then faded to obscurity and the ubiquitous gyms and exercise systems claiming to be the best, making the right choice for yourself takes a little time and research.

One thing is certain: you need to ask yourself if your main goal is to lose weight or to get in shape? These two things are very different, though they are often believed to be the same. A person can be very thin but not very muscular, and likewise, someone may have been working on those muscles but still have a lot of pounds he or she needs to lose. How you answer that question will help you to determine if you may benefit more from the advice of a personal trainer or a dietitian.

When it comes to weight loss, exercising helps but is not nearly as effective in the short term as making changes in your diet. Shawn M. Talbott, PhD, is a nutritional biochemist and formerly acted as director of the Nutrition Clinic at the University of Utah. He said, “As a rule of thumb, weight loss is generally 75 percent diet and 25 percent exercise. An analysis of more than 700 weight loss studies found that people see the biggest short-term results when they eat smart. On average, people who dieted without exercising for 15 weeks lost 23 pounds; the exercisers lost only six over about 21 weeks. It’s much easier to cut calories than to burn them off exercising. For example, if you eat a fast-food steak quesadilla, which can pack 500-plus calories, you need to run more than four miles to ʻundo’ it.”

If you had a choice between jogging for thirty minutes to burn off the calories, or just eliminating two 16-ounce cans of soda, what would be the easier choice? For weight loss, seeing a dietitian for help in planning an appropriate diet that is safe and effective in helping you reach your goals is probably your best choice.

On the other hand, if you are not so much interested in losing weight as in developing your muscle mass, which will also help in long-term weight loss goals (more muscle increases metabolism), the personal trainer might be the way to go. A personal trainer can create a personalized regimen for you that will help you increase your strength, introduce you to new types of exercises, prepare you for any physical challenges you want to undertake (like running a 5K or marathon), help you stay motivated, and help you develop fitness goals that can ultimately encourage weight loss.

Whether your goal is to become more physically fit by increasing your muscle mass and overall strength, or to lose some weight, or both, the help of a personal trainer or dietitian will help you attain your goal faster with healthy practices and without injury.

Below are some professional organizations that you can contact to locate certified professionals:

 

 

Staying Motivated to Exercise During Cold Weather

The weather is starting to get colder and the days shorter, which can make exercising the last thing you want to do. When it’s dark outside, it’s easy to stay snuggled in your warm bed and skip your morning workout, but with all of those holiday treats right around the corner, this is no time to slack off. How can you stay motivated to exercise in the colder months?

Set goals and make a plan.

Don’t wait for New Year’s resolutions; set goals for yourself now and make a plan to meet them. Whether your goals are to get fit, lose weight, or de-stress, or all of the above, schedule your workouts on your calendar just as you would a work meeting or doctor’s appointment. Treat these appointments just as you would any other important appointment, and then get the satisfaction of marking it off your “to do” list.

Move indoors.

If it’s too cold to do your regular run, walk, or bike ride outdoors, move your workout inside. You don’t need to belong to a gym to work out indoors. There are plenty of things you can do at home to stay fit: use workout DVDs or get free workouts on YouTube. If you have the space and it’s in your budget, invest in a treadmill or stationary bike to use at home. You can also try out fitness classes at places other than a standard gym—yoga studios, dance studios, and recreation centers. They offer all types of classes that often don’t involve a monthly contract.

Enlist a partner.

It’s always harder to skip a workout if someone else is depending on you. Partner with a friend to work out together this fall and winter. Bundle up and head out for a walk or run together, or find something else active you can do together such as playing indoor tennis, swimming indoors at a local YMCA, or trying out a new fitness class.

Ward off winter blues.

Remind yourself why working out, even when you don’t want to, always makes you feel better. Exercising on dark, cold days can help you keep away the winter blues by boosting your body’s endorphins. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is real and affects 10 to 20 percent of people, and exercise is one way to prevent or lessen its symptoms.

Reward yourself.

Staying motivated to exercise throughout the colder months is challenging. Reward yourself for staying active by treating yourself to a soak in a hot bath or a relaxing massage for sore muscles. Also, make sure you are getting enough sleep.

Finding Time to Exercise for Busy Parents

Now that kids are back in school, and you’re back in your daily routine, finding the time to exercise can be a challenge for busy parents. Whether you’re working full-time or part-time along with taking care of a newborn, chasing after a toddler, or chauffeuring older kids to and from school and activities, it’s easy to go for days without fitting in a workout. Add in a hefty dose of guilt for not spending your free time with your kids, and it’s a recipe for abandoning regular exercise altogether.

With such busy lives, we have to schedule in time to exercise every week, or it may never happen. Think of it as another way to stay healthy for your family. Even if you get in 10-minute increments throughout the day, just moving more will make a huge difference in your overall health, outlook, and well-being, which in turn, will only make you a better parent.

Make exercise a priority by using these tips for finding ways to sneak it into a busy lifestyle:

Strollercize!

Got a baby or toddler? Take advantage of nap time by loading your little one(s) into a jogging stroller and take a walk, or run for 30 minutes.

Find a buddy

Enlist a friend to share workouts. You’re less likely to skip a workout if you’ve promised to meet a friend at the gym or at the park for a walk. Or you can also trade babysitting duties while the other works out.

Play with your kids

Spend time with your kids and exercise at the same time. Kick around a soccer ball with your kids in the yard; go on a bike ride together; walk the dog, or take them to the playground, and join in a game of chase or tag.

Download it

There are endless workout videos available for download as well as on DVD. Especially when it’s raining or the weather turns cold, working out at home to a video is an easy way to fit in exercise. You can even have your kids join you to make it a fun, family affair.

Hit the gym

Join a gym that offers childcare or offers a children’s program your kids can participate in while you and your spouse or partner work out.

Lunch break

If your office allows, eat lunch at your desk, and use your lunch break to go to the gym, or walk or run outdoors a few days a week.

Rise and shine

Get up early before the rest of your house, and get your workout out in before your family’s hectic morning routine starts. You’ll start the day energized and won’t have any excuses later in the day when things like a sick child or schedule changes could derail your workout plans.

Recognizing the Signs of Heat Exhaustion

Summer may be winding down, but the weather outside is still hot. With fall just around the corner, you may be dreaming of pumpkin spice lattes and cozy sweaters, but in many parts of the country, September is still one of the hottest months of the year, so exercising outdoors should still be done with caution to prevent heat exhaustion.

 

Heat exhaustion happens when your body overheats. This condition is caused by exposure to high temperatures, especially when there is a combination of high humidity and strenuous activity. It is usually accompanied by dehydration. If not treated quickly and properly, heat exhaustion can progress to a more serious, life-threatening condition known as heatstroke. That’s why knowing the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and how to treat it is so important.

Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion

  • Excessive sweating
  • Feeling faint or weak
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Rapid pulse
  • Muscle cramps

Anyone can experience heat exhaustion, but infants, children, and the elderly are especially at risk during hot weather. Don’t forget that dogs and other pets can also get heat exhaustion and heat stroke, so never leave your furry friends outdoors for extended periods during hot weather, and never leave a pet, child, or infant in a hot car.

Treatment for heat exhaustion

If you experience any of the symptoms of heat exhaustion when exercising or spending a lot of time outdoors in the heat, the first thing to do is stop the activity and move indoors to a cooler place. Rehydrate your body with water or a sports drink to replace important electrolytes that are lost when your body overheats. Applying ice packs or cold, wet towels to your forehead, back of neck, and wrists can also help. With prompt treatment, your symptoms should resolve in a couple of hours, but if they do not or you feel worse, seek medical treatment as soon as possible.

If you do not get out of the heat and properly treat heat exhaustion, symptoms can quickly progress to heatstroke, which is a life-threatening emergency. Signs of heatstroke include confusion,  odd behavior, agitation, high fever, and seizure. If you or anyone you are with are displaying signs of heatstroke, always call 911 immediately.

You can prevent heat exhaustion by being aware of symptoms anytime you are outdoors in hot weather and staying hydrated by drinking fluids before, during, and after any activity.