Tag Archives: health and wellness

The Benefits of Having Healthy Employees

According to statistics from the US Department of Health and Human Services, less than 5% of adults participate in 30 minutes of physical activity each day and only one in three get the recommended amount of physical activity each week.

Persistent job stress and inactivity of employees in most workplaces contribute to obesity, diabetes, and other chronic diseases. Large corporations first offered wellness programs to their employees as a benefit, but as the fitness trend has grown each year, many smaller businesses have implemented programs, devices, and equipment to help employees become healthier.

Adjustable sitting/standing desks, balance balls, desk treadmills, and other devices as well as wellness programs can now be found in many office environments to help promote the health and well-being of employees. Businesses are implementing employee wellness programs because they like the benefits of having healthier employees.

What are the benefits of offering wellness programs, installing fitness centers, or other health-related equipment in an office environment? Many benefits are not measurable, but the following are among the reasons a business might start a wellness program:

  • Lower healthcare costs – Healthcare professionals have estimated that 70 to 90 percent of healthcare spending is for problems of chronic disease associated with unhealthy lifestyle choices—improper nutrition, too little exercise, or smoking, which costs American businesses more than one trillion dollars each year in lost productivity. From 22 studies that examined the costs of wellness programs and healthcare costs, it was found that for every dollar spent on wellness programs $3.27 was saved because of reduced healthcare costs.
  • Fewer lost work days – Healthier workers miss fewer days from work due to illness.
  • Lower stress levels – Neck, back, wrist, and arm fatigue as well as eye strain from sitting and staring at a computer during work hours contributes to fatigue and stress on the job. Exercise during wellness programs helps to dissipate stress, ease muscle strain, and provide relaxing moments—promoting a sense of well-being.
  • Promotes teamwork – Employees participating together in a wellness program are more likely to develop a spirit of camaraderie and teamwork which enhances the company culture and causes the employee to value the company more. Workplace wellness programs show that companies value and appreciate their employees and the employees are more loyal to their company.
  • Improved work performance and longer retention of employees – Since exercise increases one’s ability to focus and provides more energy to perform daily activities, employees are more productive at work. Employees who have a greater sense of well-being and who feel valued by their employers are more likely to stay with their companies.

More recent studies of wellness programs in 2019 cast doubt on the benefits the programs actually produce, but many factors go into how wellness programs are initiated and supported by the businesses and corporations that started them.

There have been many studies which have examined the results and benefits of wellness programs. One study that looked at nearly 200,000 wellness program participants showed that 5 out of 7 health risks improved after one year.

One thing seems certain: Companies will end programs from which they derive no benefit for their employees or their “bottom line.” The benefits of a workplace wellness program outweigh the costs.

Fish and Seafood: Risk or Myth

Although most people enjoy eating seafood, some will only eat certain  types of seafood while others avoid eating it altogether for fear that it is harmful or unsafe. That may be because of some myths about it that have persisted.

Let’s examine several sayings to discover whether they are myths or if we are taking a risk to ignore them.

  • Seafood is full of mercury, and eating it will harm your body; it should be avoided—especially by pregnant women and young children.

Mercury is a mineral which occurs naturally in our environment. It can be turned into the poisonous compound, methylmercury, by bacteria and natural processes and can accumulate in streams and oceans where it enters the food chain as each fish absorbs the mercury of smaller fish it eats. That is the reason that larger fish contain larger amounts of mercury than smaller ones. Almost all fish contain some amounts of mercury.

Mercury toxicity can disrupt brain function and harm the nervous system. It can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman and accumulate in the blood and tissues of the developing fetus and can also pass through a mother’s breast milk. So, pregnant women should eat only low-mercury fish (sardines, trout, salmon, etc.) and  limit it to 12 oz. per week. They need to avoid eating raw or uncooked fish since it may contain microorganisms that can harm the developing fetus. Click here to learn more.

Fish and seafood are loaded with important nutrients such as iodine and vitamin D that many people are deficient in, as well as omega-3 fatty acids which are crucial for optimal body and brain function and are strongly linked to a reduced risk for many diseases.

The Food and Drug Administration tests for mercury and the Environmental Protection Agency determines safe mercury levels for women of childbearing age. And most states issue advisories to warn people when they are aware of methylmercury contamination stating the types, size, and amounts of fish that are of concern.

Conclusion: It is safe to eat fish and seafood as long as you choose those that are low in mercury and observe guidelines for the amount you should consume per week.

  • You should only eat oysters in months that contain the letter “R”.

A widely known myth about oysters is that you should only eat them in months that contain the letter “R” like September and October, etc., but not June, July, and August. This used to be true because the warm months were when oysters spawned and not eating them gave them time to reproduce. Spawning oysters do not taste good and warmer waters in the “R-less” months also increased the prevalence of certain bacteria in raw oysters that made people sick.

Raw oysters could make you sick, but strict government regulations lower that risk. Making sure oysters are properly cooked will eliminate that danger.

NOAA Fisheries estimates that the US imports more than 80% of the seafood we eat with approximately half of that produced from aquaculture (or farmed). Currently, there are at least six federal agencies that regulate different aspects of the U.S. Aquaculture industry. These regulations have promoted greater confidence in farmed seafood, and today, people eat oysters year-round.

Conclusion: It is most likely safe to eat oysters year-round because of strict government regulations that govern the seafood industry.

  • Are Oysters an aphrodisiac?

This myth may have started with Casanova, a famous womanizer from the 18th century who was said to have eaten 60 of the mollusks each day to power his amorous adventures.

In 2005, George Fisher, a chemistry professor at Miami’s Barry University, found that mussels contained the amino acid, D-Aspartic acid, which had been found to increase the level of sex hormones in lab rats. Although the study did not include oysters, Fisher was quoted in a number of different publications speculating that the amino acid might contribute to an aphrodisiac effect.

Oysters are a good source of zinc (a zinc deficiency can have a detrimental effect on the reproductive system) which is known to help boost testosterone levels.

But in an article by Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, she states “No food has been scientifically proven to stimulate the human sex organs. But foods and the act of eating can suggest sex to the mind, which in turn can help stimulate desire in the body.”

Conclusion: No real aphrodisiac effect has been proven, but if the act of eating oysters creates a sensual pleasure, why not!

Airport Gyms and Fitness Vacations – Exercise On the Go Part 2!

Being away from home or traveling is not a reason to lose the gains you have made by starting an exercise/fitness routine. Here are more ways to continue to maintain your exercise goals.

At Airport Terminals

If you have a long layover at an airport, you can walk laps around the inside of the terminal (wear or pack walking shoes in your carry-on luggage). You can leave your luggage at the lost luggage counter (the most common place to leave it since they have the necessary storage space there), and the attendants will keep an eye on it for a daily fee. Many airports also have coin-operated luggage lockers.

If you are one of those people who aren’t motivated to exercise when traveling unless it is in a gym-type setting around others who are working out, you will find more options than you might expect. Fitness/workout centers are not as lucrative for airports as restaurants and stores, but that may be changing. These pioneers in US airport gyms are among the best available to work out while you wait for your flight:

  • Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport – Features free 24-hour Yoga studio with free use of yoga mats and a looping DVD with instruction as well as a LiveWell Walking Path (measuring seven-tenths of a mile) and includes two 55-foot high staircases for an extra cardio challenge. (In Terminal D)
  • Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport – The Westin WORKOUT Fitness studio in the Westin Hotel is connected to the World Gateway Terminal in the Delta hub. Non-hotel guests can use the gym for a modest fee and rent shoes, t-shirts, and shorts.
  • Baltimore-Washington International Airport – Roam Fitness in the terminal (after security, between concourses D and E) – You can rent workout clothes and shoes, and you can shower after your workout. They have healthy meals and recovery drinks available as well.
  • Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport – They have a 1.4 mile walking path located at the Lindbergh Terminal (starting at the intersection of the C and D concourses.
  • San Francisco International Airport – Yoga room – This self-led practice studio is open 24 hours at no charge. Yoga mats are also available. (Located just past security in Terminal 2)

These gyms offer day passes to use their facilities at reasonable prices.

Leave Nothing to Chance

You can be sure to maintain your fitness routine if your travel vacation is paired with planned fitness activities. Fitness-themed vacations have grown in popularity in the last ten years. These are some of the travel sites offering fitness activities plus active tourist adventures.

  • Active Escapes – Offers fitness retreats to destinations such as Bali, Barbados, South Africa, Australia, Greece, and other exotic destinations. Professional trainers provide daily training sessions and activities designed for the location. All costs included in the trip price.
  • Fit and Fly Girl (for women) – Hosts fitness, wellness, and cultural retreats for women in locations around the world. Provides accommodations, fitness classes, healthy and delicious food, wellness activities, spa treatments, cultural excursions, entertainment, and time to care for oneself while creating new friendships with other women.
  • Jungle Bay Dominica Fitness Boot Camp – Enjoy fitness activities while also exploring the beaches and jungles of Dominica. Instructor-led fitness regimes, hikes, and yoga sessions as well as snorkeling, kayaking, cooking classes, etc.
  • Big Sky Yoga Retreats – In Montana where you will have yoga sessions, Nordic ski lessons, meditation, and wildlife watching. In winter, you can also enjoy horse-drawn sleigh rides while you’re having your dinner!
  • Backroads – Active vacations with biking, hiking, multi-adventure tours. Trips are organized based on different levels and abilities, catering to singles, families, or private groups.

 

 

Staying Fit While Traveling – Exercise On the Go Part 1

Many things happen during the summer months that break or interfere with our usual routines: vacations, trips, weddings in different cities or locations, visiting relatives and friends, and unexpected events that require us to leave home. These things may be a welcome change, but all too often, they are used as an excuse to stop the diet and/or exercise routine we have so faithfully been following.

No Excuses 

Skip the excuses and admit that you can exercise and keep up your level of fitness with little or no equipment other than your own body. Some of the most effective workout exercises can be done using only your own body weight. You just need to choose exercises that use as many muscle groups at once as possible and expend the greatest amount of energy (rather than exercising one muscle at a time) as this takes less time overall and achieves maximum results. Some of those exercises are listed below, and they can be done in a hotel room or just about anywhere within a small amount of space:

Have just six minutes to get in your on-the-go exercise? Here is a six-minute, high intensity interval training(HIIT), full-body workout that seems guaranteed to keep your fitness level up.

As long as you have your cell phone with you, you have an unlimited source of free apps and YouTube exercise videos to choose from.

Plan Ahead

Prior to traveling to your destination, whether on business or for pleasure, check out scenic attractions in the area and see if there are walking tours that will take you by these attractions, or use a map to plan your own walking tour. It won’t feel like exercise because you are exploring a new location. Some cities have bike-share programs, so you could rent a bike for an hour or so and exercise while you explore a park or other scenic part of town.

Stay tuned for the second part of this article where we’ll talk about which airports have gyms in them and a few of our favorite fitness vacations!

 

 

 

Gardeners Rejoice!

How Gardening is Good For You

This is the time of year when yards come alive and we gardeners once again plan our gardens and begin selecting the beautiful flowers and vegetables that will fill our outdoor spaces. But the rewards we reap are not only colorful yards and tasty food that we have grown ourselves. Gardening is also wonderful for your health. It’s a great way to get that vitamin D which our bodies create when we spend time in the sun. By gardening, you can boost your endurance and strength, as well as flexibility.

benefits of gardening

Another terrific aspect of gardening is that you can burn a lot of calories as you are preparing the soil, tilling and hoeing, digging and planting, and weeding and pruning. These activities are a great way to work some good cardiovascular exercise into your daily routine.

Jeff Restuccio who wrote Fitness the Dynamic Gardening Way says it’s a good idea to alternate the more physically challenging gardening activities with the lighter work for a more structured exercise workout. He suggests, for example, raking for a while, then digging holes, then pruning.

As you do your “gardening exercise,” concentrate on deep breathing, and for a real boost in calorie burning, exaggerate your movements to increase the range of motion. For example, while raking or digging, stretch further than you usually would. This can increase your calorie burning from 100-200 per hour up to 500 per hour according to Restuccio. The actual number of calories burned varies with age, weight, and how much muscle you have. The heavier you are, the more calories you will burn. The younger you are, the more calories you’ll burn. Also, muscle burns more calories than fat, so if you have a more muscular build, you will also burn more calories.

In addition, try switching back and forth between hands when raking. Rake with your right hand 15 times, then do 15 times with your left hand. This will ensure both sides of your body are getting an equal work out.

For people who don’t consider gardening a real workout, Restuccio says, “If you think double digging (going down a foot, turning the soil over, then down another foot, bringing that soil to the top) isn’t exercise, you haven’t tried it.”

One of the best things about working in the garden, aside from the actual harvest, is that you can do it with the whole family. Get the kids and the grandparents out in the garden and let everyone participate. Make it a bonding activity that all can share, and in the process, everyone can get healthier too!

Some gardening safety tips:

  • Remember to stretch before you begin; gardening is exercise, and you can just as easily injure a muscle gardening as you can working out in the gym.
  • Be sure to stay well hydrated and use sunscreen.
  • To avoid hurting your back or knees, use a cushion when working close to the ground.
  • Instead of sitting on your heels, try to keep your back straight and be sure to stand and stretch every 10 minutes or so.
  • When choosing your shovel or spade, look for one that is lightweight and has a long handle.
  • Don’t overload your shovel when digging, and remember to bend at the knee, stepping forward when you raise and dump each shovel full of dirt.
  • While bending to pick up tools or heavy bags, bend at the knees and hips to avoid back strain.

Spring-Clean Your Mood!

When the days grow longer and become warmer, we all feel like breaking out of our winter ruts and changing our routines.  While you are spring-cleaning your house, why not spring-clean your mood as well? We have some ideas that can help you get healthier and put the winter blues behind you.

Bring Nature Inside

Find some fresh flowers in the garden or cut some beautiful foliage to put in a vase. The flowers will bring color into the house, and you can enjoy their sweet fragrance as well. According to Deborah Serani, a psychology professor at Adelphi University and author of Living with Depression, “Studies show that having greenery in your life reduces stress, reduces depressed mood, improves attention and concentration, reduces high blood pressure, and creates an atmosphere of beauty.  Adding plants and flowers works wonders for your well-being.”

Aromatherapy has become quite popular as a way to enhance mood, and the natural aromas flowers bring can be just as effective as oils. Not only do they provide a pleasing look and scent, but having plants in the house also raises the oxygen levels as well, making the air healthier and easier to breathe.

Remove Clutter to Revitalize

Getting rid of things no longer of use to you not only improves your living space, but it is beneficial for your state of mind as well. A cluttered space can induce stress and anxiety. Mary Jo Kreitzer, RN, Ph.D, said, “Since the earliest times, humans have needed to be sensitive to their surroundings to survive, which means that we have an innate awareness of our environment and seek out environments with certain qualities.” She elaborated that humans tend to seek out places where we can feel safe and secure—without too much stimulus—and places that provide physical comfort as well.

Your psychological comfort is affected by your surroundings. It is important that you let go of things you really don’t have room for, to keep your space uncluttered and soothing. As you sort through the things you truly want and need versus things that are only cluttering up your space and your life, you hone your identity and begin to understand what is truly important to you. This can bring joy and a sense of tranquility.

Rearrange for a New View, and a New You

Simply rearranging your furniture can be a major mood enhancer.  When moving into a new home, many of us will just put our couches and tables into whatever arrangement seems obvious. There are often other arrangements we never consider which could create a much better flow of energy in a room. The positioning of furniture can have a huge impact on your mood and on your enjoyment of your living space.

Omar Elbaga suggested on TinyBuddha, “Balance is more important than symmetry. The rule of thumb is to think outside the box and don’t decorate in the most obvious way.” Try turning your couch at an angle, with chairs positioned for easy conversation. Or, if you have the couch in the center of the room, experiment with pushing it up against a wall. You can often make a room look bigger just by the way you arrange the furniture.

According to Psychology Today, by rearranging your furniture, you can elevate your mood and instill satisfaction, effectiveness, comfort, and creativity. This is another way that you can spring-clean your way to better health.

Make the Most of your Mow…

Now that Spring has sprung, we must deal with fast-growing grass and weeds in the yard. While we tend to think of yard work as a chore, it is also a great opportunity to get some good exercise. You may want to opt for a push-mower instead of a riding mower and let working in the yard count as your daily exercise.

While the physical health benefits of exercise are reason enough by themselves, we also get the added boost of mood improvement from regular exercise. Exercise increases serotonin, which helps your brain to regulate sleep, appetite, and mood; overall, exercise helps alleviate chronic depression. Exercise also reduces certain chemicals in the immune system which can worsen depression.

A recent study has linked routine physical exertion with improvements in memory in older adults. We do a lot of bending and lifting when we work out in the yard, so spring cleaning outside offers an amazing amount of unexpected benefits. Fitness guru Jillian Michaels says that gardening “can burn up to 256 calories an hour, and lawn mowing 160 calories per half-hour.”

So, when you look out your window at the overgrown grass and the dandelions, instead of thinking of mowing it as a chore, think of all the good you are doing for your body, mind, and mental health by “spring-cleaning” your mood while you mow.

How to Exercise When the Pollen Count is High

If you are one of the many people who loves staying active outdoors, but you suffer from seasonal allergies, then you may find yourself becoming a lot more sedentary when spring arrives. Skipping out on these activities may help keep your allergies under control but becoming a “couch potato” is not the answer. Keep active by staying informed, changing your routine, and utilizing these strategies that will keep your body in motion and your energy at peak.

Track the Count
First you need to keep track of the pollen counts in your area. If you know which allergens you are sensitive to, that is even better. Many local news stations will tell you whether weed, tree, or grass pollens are expected to be higher than usual, and this can help you prepare. Another fast way to check pollen counts is online. Websites, such as the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology keep national pollen counts. You can check your local counts by clicking here.

Keep Your Eye on the Clock
Typically pollen counts will begin to rise in the morning and peak at midday, gradually falling toward evening. Generally, the lowest pollen count will be early in the morning before sunrise and late in the afternoon to early evening. However, if the pollen count is very high or if it is a windy day, pollen counts may remain elevated longer than usual. It is also normal in urban areas for the counts to peak and fall later than in the suburbs. Try to schedule your exercise to avoid the peak times of high pollen counts. The best time to get out is right after a good rainfall which washes a lot of the pollen out of the air and greatly reduces the pollen count.

Break out the Barriers
While outside, sunglasses can help protect your eyes not only from the sun, but also from pollen. Dab some Vaseline® around the edge of each of your nostrils before going out. This helps block pollen but be sure to reapply if you blow your nose. Covering your nose and mouth with a mask will really help minimize your inhalation of pollen when counts are high.

Choose an Alternative to Exercising Outdoors
If you usually exercise outside, consider trying a different venue for high pollen count days. There are many exciting and enjoyable opportunities such as indoor mountain climbing, indoor skiing, and even indoor sky diving.
A little less extreme option, but one that is easy and inexpensive is heading to a local indoor pool. Did you know that exercising in water is a great way to strengthen muscles? Water offers natural resistance that provides a more intense workout and increases the benefits of strengthening and toning. Even if you are not a swimmer, just walking, doing water aerobics, or dancing in the water offers great benefits. Many gyms and YMCAs offer the use of pools among their amenities for members, and city pools usually have a low entry fee for city residents.

In addition, Dr. Jay M. Portnoy, Division Director of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology at Children’s Mercy Hospitals in Kansas City says, “Allergies trigger asthma, making it much more difficult to exercise. It’s recommended that people with asthma take up swimming as an aerobic activity. The reason exercise makes asthma worse is because the airways dry out and get cold when you’re breathing fast. If you’re swimming instead of running outdoors, then there’s more moisture and warmth so you’re less likely to have trouble breathing.” Going to an indoor pool is a great way to avoid that pollen without skipping your exercise.

If walking or running is your thing, think “inside” the box. Many cities now have totally enclosed walking paths stretching for miles that can be an excellent way to get your exercise without subjecting yourself to pollen. If your city does not have an enclosed skywalk or underground pedestrian system, check with your local parks and recreation department as well as local fitness centers to see if there is an indoor walking track available. If not, consider walking through an indoor shopping mall or museum. Some cities have large airports that are fun to walk through as well.

Perhaps you prefer to avoid going outside altogether during pollen season. You can still get some great exercise right at home. If you own a treadmill or stationary bike, that would be an obvious first choice. However, for those of you who do not own any exercise equipment, why not try an exercise video? You can rent them at the library or find them available online. Amazon Prime and YouTube both have many fitness workout videos available for different fitness levels.

Whatever option you choose, it will definitely be better than skipping your exercise entirely. Track the pollen counts, strategize your timing, use barriers, and consider alternative venues for your exercise. You can avoid the pollen and still find different fun ways to stay fit!

 

Which Exercise Burns the Most Calories?

Getting the Most BURN for Your Buck!

Getting the Most BURN for Your Buck!

Whether you are doing squats, sprints, spinning, or swimming, you want to know that the exercise you choose is going to have a nice big return on investment when it comes to burning calories. You work hard and expect to see results, but which physical activity is going to help you reap the biggest rewards? After all, not all workouts are created equal.

If you don’t have a lot of time to exercise, the good news is that you can still maximize your energy expenditure with a short duration but high intensity workout. The activities which burn the greatest amount of calories are those which use more muscle mass and also involve resistance.

An excellent cardio workout for calorie burning is sprinting. Jim White, American College of Sports Medicine spokesperson, says, “Sprinting burns a massive amount of calories, but it can only be kept up for a certain amount of time.” He suggests alternating between two minutes running at the fastest pace you can sustain, and then jogging for a minute to recover before resuming the faster pace again. Running at a pace of 7.5 miles per hour, a 155-pound person can burn 465 calories in a thirty-minute span of time. That is excellent efficiency!

Tabata workouts are another incredibly efficient way to burn calories. Typical Tabata workouts will rotate between four different exercises, such as crunches, jumping rope, squat jumps, and lunges in 20-second increments followed with 10 seconds of rest. This is repeated in cycles for about half an hour. The American Council on Exercise found that in an average 20- to 30-minute Tabata workout, one can burn about 15 calories per minute, or 450 calories per half hour.

Since swimming requires using so many different muscle groups from the kicking of your legs, the stroking of your arms, and the tightening of core muscles as well, it is no wonder that this type of exercise ranks as one of the best calorie-burning cardio workouts. The type of swim stroke you choose will play a role in how many calories you burn. For example, a 155-pound person doing the butterfly stroke can burn 409 calories per half hour in comparison to 372 calories in the same time frame for the breast stroke. If you swim in the ocean, the current of the waves also gives an added challenge, upping the intensity of your workout and maximizing the calories burned.

These three types of workouts will help you burn calories fast. But, check out the exercises below to decide which type you prefer.

These activities will burn approximately the listed number of calories for a 155-pound person in a 30-minute period:

  1. Basketball ——————————————-298 cal
  2. Bicycling (12-13.9 mph) ————————– 298 cal
  3. Bicycling (20 mph) ———————————614 cal
  4. Circuit training ————————————–298 cal
  5. Cross country hiking ——————————223 cal
  6. Dancing slow (waltz, foxtrot, rumba)———-112 cal
  7. Dancing fast ( bally, twist)  ———————–223 cal
  8. Dancing (disco, ballroom, square) ————-205 cal
  9. Elliptical trainer ———————————— 335 cal
  10. Fencing ———————————————–223 cal
  11. High-impact aerobics —————————–260 cal
  12. High-impact step aerobics ———————–372 cal
  13. Horseback riding ———————————–149 cal
  14. Ice skating ——————————————–260 cal
  15. Jumping rope —————————————372 cal
  16.  Kayaking  ——————————————–186 cal
  17. Low-impact aerobics ——————————205 cal
  18. Low-impact step aerobics ————————260 cal
  19. Martial arts (judo, karate, kickbox) ————372 cal
  20. Moderate calisthenics —————————–167 cal
  21. Moderate stationary bicycling ——————260 cal
  22. Moderate stationary rowing ———————260 cal
  23. Running (5 mph) ————————————298 cal
  24. Running (7.5 mph) ———————————465 cal
  25. Running (10 mph) ———————————-614 cal
  26. Ski machine ——————————————353 cal
  27. Soccer ————————————————-260 cal
  28. Stair-step machine ———————————223 cal
  29. Stretching, Hatha yoga —————————-149 cal
  30. Swimming (backstroke) —————————298 cal
  31. Swimming (vigorously) or breaststroke ——-372 cal
  32. Swimming (butterfly or crawl) —————— 409 cal
  33. Tai Chi ————————————————–149 cal
  34. Tennis ————————————————–260 cal
  35. Vigorous stationary rowing ———————–316 cal
  36. Vigorous Tabata ————————————-450 cal
  37. Volleyball ———————————————149 cal
  38. Walking (4.5 mph) ———————————-186 cal
  39. Weight lifting (vigorous) ————————–223 cal

 

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), more than 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes (that is 9.4% of the US population). And 7.2 million people may be undiagnosed. The count is rising every year.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes  is a chronic disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. The insulin hormone, which is made by the pancreas, helps the body turn blood sugar into energy. Blood sugar levels are a measure of how well a person’s body uses glucose. A diabetic person has high blood sugar (glucose) when his/her body does not produce enough insulin or because his/her body cells do not respond adequately to insulin, or both.

How are diabetics classified?

Type 1 – The body does not make insulin. It can appear at any age but is usually  diagnosed in children and young adults. Their bodies do not make insulin,  and they must take it to stay alive.

Type 2 –  The body does not make enough insulin or use it well. One can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, but it most often occurs in middle-aged to older people. This is the most common type of diabetes.

Gestational Diabetes – This diabetes type develops in some pregnant women but usually  goes away when the baby is born.  About 50% of women with gestational diabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes later in life.

Risks for developing diabetes

A person’s risk for developing diabetes depends upon a number of factors, some of which can be controlled and some (age, family history, ethnicity) which cannot.

Some of the risk factors that can be controlled are these:

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Having high blood pressure
  • Having a low level of  HDL (good) cholesterol, or a high level of triglycerides
  • Being physically inactive
  • Having a history of heart disease or stroke
  • Having a history of gestational diabetes

Getting an A1C test (sometimes called the hemoglobin A1C) at your next physical will indicate whether you have diabetes or are at risk for developing it. The higher your A1C levels, the greater your risk of diabetes complications. With an A1C level over 6.5 percent, type 2 diabetes is indicated.

Tips to Avoid Gaining Weight After You Stop Smoking

Do you plan to participate in the Great American Smokeout this month (Nov. 15) and kick the nasty habit once and for all?

You can do it!

We all know that smoking is an addiction which produces withdrawal symptoms when stopped. But did you know that the  physical withdrawal symptoms last only a few days to about a week. After that, it is the psychological symptoms (cravings) that are the most difficult to overcome. But cravings will lessen the longer you resist the urge to smoke until finally, you find that you really have quit smoking.

Some people say they smoke because it helps to keep them from gaining weight, and experts have said that it is common for people to gain some weight when they give up the habit permanently. Since smoking increases metabolism, quitting causes your metabolism to slow slightly; however, most smokers gain less than 10 pounds.

For those who gain more weight, it is likely that they use food (especially sweets and high-caloric foods) to help curb nicotine cravings.

Here are four tips to help keep you from gaining weight after stopping smoking:

1. Plan for healthy eating before you quit smoking.

Stock your kitchen with healthy food choices so when the urge to snack hits, you will have them within easy reach. You may start to crave sweets after you quit (your sense of taste and smell improve)—and satisfying these cravings can prevent you from reaching for a cigarette. Just make sure the sweets you eat are not calorie-laden, sugary treats. (Fruits like grapes, strawberries, sugar-free candy and gum are acceptable substitutes).

2. Substitute the cigarette in your hand with something else.

Your body and brain are accustomed to the pattern of constantly putting your hand to your mouth when smoking, so replace the smoking pattern with an alternative. According to the AHA (American Heart Association), eating a food like air-popped popcorn will take time to eat, keep your hands busy, reduce the urge to smoke, and help you to feel full. (Five cups of air-popped popcorn has only 150 calories.)

3. Drink lots of water. It not only keeps your body hydrated, but also fills you up and lessens the desire to snack.

4. Amp up the exercise! If you are sedentary, adding exercise or increasing the exercise you already do will increase your metabolism. Walking and extra 30-45 minutes a day can make up for the metabolism slow-down from quitting smoking and keep your weight stable.

Smoking releases thousands of toxic chemicals into your body, which damage your heart, lungs, and other organs. But quitting, even after years of smoking, can reverse these effects and add years to your life.